Covid Creativity_MS

Concave Mirror - Anish Kapoor - 2010 MoMA

Aaron Laniosz
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Untitled
Anish Kapoor (British (born India) 1954)
Date: 2007
Medium: Stainless steel
Dimensions: 89 3/4 x 89 1/4 x 16 1/2 in. (228 x 226.7 x 41.9 cm)

Created for public interaction and engagement with the surrounding space, this sculpture draws the viewer in with its refined surface and startling optical effects of depth and dimension. From a body of Kapoor's work of mirrorlike pieces that reflect or distort the viewer and the surroundings and suggest the notion of continuous space, it offers a dazzling experience of light and a startling optical effect. Deeply rooted metaphysical polarities are at play in Kapoor's work: presence and absence, being and nonbeing, solidity and intangibility, and he draws on both Western and Eastern cultures for inspiration. His intention to engage the viewer and provoke a physical and visceral response is achieved in this reflective sculpture with its faceted facade that fuses the work, the viewer, and the environment into one pixelated, constantly fluctuating mosaic.

The distance and angle that one stands from the mirror's surface affects how the image of the viewer is reflected. This is a very interesting work of art in that it brings the curiosity out in the viewer and creates a dance-like interaction with the sculpture, as one's tendency is to move around in front of the piece to see how that changes one's perception of it. The viewer can actually "create" their own visual experience based on how they stand and move in front of the mirrors.

https://artsology.com/mirror-art.php

https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/495458

Precedents

Saba Ghole

Precedents


What is a Precedent?

A precedent is a project done in the real world that can be used to help explain some of the ideas that will be covered in the studio or project. Students should locate and critically evaluate precedents and demonstrate how the content of the relate to their projects. 

Precedents generally fall into a number of categories - conceptual, aspirational, and comparable. 

  • Conceptual precedents explore ideas related to the  studio through critical analysis  of a wide range of largely art-based projects. 
  • Aspirational precedents look at cutting-edge or futurist implementation of technology as related to the studio topic. 
  • Comparable precedents look at nascent or current projects, often in the marketplace, that relate to the theme of the studio at a design and technological level that students can reasonably achieve within the course of the Studio. 

Through a critical analysis and melding of these categories, students can develop ideas for creative and technical innovations based on an expansive understanding of the theme.

What Makes a Good Precedent?

  • Meaningful
    • Provides a rich social, historical or cultural context
    • Highlight examples of current relevant projects
  • Inspiring & Exciting
    • Shows a novel approach
    • Shows a novel design solution
    • Exposes students to concepts, projects, and research that they are unaware of.
    • Helps generate conversation about the studio topic early in the research and brainstorming process.
  • Focused
    • Shows a novel technical, functional, or mechanical application
    • Shows a conceptual application
  • Guiding
    • Shows students options, avenues, and principles at any point during the design process.  Precedents are useful throughout the studio, not just at the beginning.

Posting Precedents

A precedent can be a video or a series of images. Image posts should have a Title and Caption on every slide.

Every Precedent should include the following in the body of the post:

  • The name of the project/device/object/installation/book etc and the name of the creator.
  • A source link to the original content.
  • A reason why the precedent is  it is applicable to the project.
  • Analysis (if appropriate) of the precedent. This can be technical or conceptual. 

Examples

Please see examples below.

Step 2: Blank Sheet of ... Cardboard

Max Vanatta

Purpose: (Again) The perception of making is that you need fancy tools and specific materials to create a successful prototype, but this is not the case.  We will practice using simple and available materials to make all manners of different creations.   


Process: 

  1. We will start out with simple sheets of cardboard and you will be asked to make a box.  A simple, but nicely made box following these rules: 
    • The box should be made of only paper and tape/tacky glue.
    • The box should be 2in x 2in x 3.5in
    • The box should be as cleanly made as possible.
    • Every stage should be photographed.  To be clear, take a picture of your flat paper pieces, partially assembled box, and fully assembled box.  
  2. Now that you know how to cut, tape, glue, and construct well, you will choose an everyday object.  This could be a pencil, computer, phone, etc...  But it must be completely replicated in cardboard following these rules:
    • Only paper, tape and tacky glue can be used.
    • The object must be larger that 4" in at least one dimension, and please not too big...
    • The object, if simple, will need to be completed even better and more realistically.
    • Every stage should be photographed.  To be clear, take a picture of your flat paper pieces, partially assembled object, and fully assembled object.
  3. Post these images and any key lessons you learned in a post.

Some Notes: 

- You could easily just toss together something which looks vaguely like a box and then choose an object such as a brick and call it a day, but why?  If you put in some caring to learn just the basics in these first few exercises, the entire rest of the year will be ten times easier.  So if you do decide to make a brick your object, show some care and ask yourself, how can you show every single detail of that brick?

- You could just do one box and leave it there, but just like learning a language, the repetition of this process will make your experience and skill far better.  

Deliverables: 

You will be responsible for a post including: 

  • a picture of the flat box pieces
  • a picture of your partially assembled box
  • a picture of your completed box (3x, different views)
  • a picture of the flat object pieces
  • a picture of your partially assembled object
  • a picture of your completed object (3x, different views) 

Step 2: Blank Sheet of ... Cardboard

Max Vanatta

Purpose: (Again) The perception of making is that you need fancy tools and specific materials to create a successful prototype, but this is not the case.  We will practice using simple and available materials to make all manners of different creations.   


Process: 

  1. We will start out with simple sheets of cardboard and you will be asked to make a box.  A simple, but nicely made box following these rules: 
    • The box should be made of only paper and tape/tacky glue.
    • The box should be 2in x 2in x 3.5in
    • The box should be as cleanly made as possible.
    • Every stage should be photographed.  To be clear, take a picture of your flat paper pieces, partially assembled box, and fully assembled box.  
  2. Now that you know how to cut, tape, glue, and construct well, you will choose an everyday object.  This could be a pencil, computer, phone, etc...  But it must be completely replicated in cardboard following these rules:
    • Only paper, tape and tacky glue can be used.
    • The object must be larger that 4" in at least one dimension, and please not too big...
    • The object, if simple, will need to be completed even better and more realistically.
    • Every stage should be photographed.  To be clear, take a picture of your flat paper pieces, partially assembled object, and fully assembled object.
  3. Post these images and any key lessons you learned in a post.

Some Notes: 

- You could easily just toss together something which looks vaguely like a box and then choose an object such as a brick and call it a day, but why?  If you put in some caring to learn just the basics in these first few exercises, the entire rest of the year will be ten times easier.  So if you do decide to make a brick your object, show some care and ask yourself, how can you show every single detail of that brick?

- You could just do one box and leave it there, but just like learning a language, the repetition of this process will make your experience and skill far better.  

Deliverables: 

You will be responsible for a post including: 

  • a picture of the flat box pieces
  • a picture of your partially assembled box
  • a picture of your completed box (3x, different views)
  • a picture of the flat object pieces
  • a picture of your partially assembled object
  • a picture of your completed object (3x, different views) 

Your TED

Max Vanatta
1 / 3

Purpose: The process of design is completely entangled with the core elements of this assignment, communication and identity.  It is important for us to make this a top priority as we begin our design process.

Process: Each of us, me included, will put together a short presentation which describes briefly who we are, and then shares one thing you are passionate about.  Specifically it should be in this format: 

  • What's your name?
  • How did you come to be who you are today? (First half- 5 minutes)
    • Tell us some important parts of your life.
    • What events shaped you or who?
  • What is something you are passionate about? (Second half - 5 minutes)
    • Tell us about the topic
    • Tell us about some of the details
    • Tell us about why you care so deeply about it
    • Tell us why we should care so much about it
  • Ask for any questions

(Total time per person - 10 minutes)

Something to think about when doing this- You are the expert on this topic. We are going to be doing a lot of sharing in this class and it is important that when you engage with this class, you are also engaging with all your classmates. We must be able to respect and trust each other with our ideas.  

Also remember that there are many ways of communicating these ideas.  You do not need to simply use a series of images and talk over them, there are other ways which you could choose. Feel free to use the one that you are most comfortable with and that you feel will best share this information.

Deliverables: 

Pleas post your presentation in the response tab of this assignment.  

One Minute _ Cardboard Box

Ray Majewski
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OneMinute_Cardboard.png

Files

Bristol

Chris Perry
1 / 3